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You are here: Home / People / Willa Z. Silverman

Willa Z. Silverman

Willa Z. Silverman

Malvin E. and Lea P. Bank Professor of French and Jewish Studies

Head, Department of French and Francophone Studies

Fields: French society, culture and politics, 1870-1914; Belle Époque; Art Nouveau; history of the book/print culture studies; France and the Holocaust; history of Jews in modern France.


Email:

Education:

  1. Ph.D., French Studies, New York University, 1988
  2. M.A., French Studies, New York University, 1983
  3. B.A., History and Literature, Harvard University, 1981

Biography:

Dr. Silverman's fields of specialization include French society, culture and politics, 1870-1914, Art Nouveau, history of the book/print culture studies and France and the Holocaust. She is the author of The Notorious Life of Gyp: Right-Wing Anarchist in Fin-de-Siècle France (Oxford UP, 1995 and in French translation: Gyp, La dernière des Mirabeau, with a preface by Michel Winock [Plon-Perrin, 1998]); The New Bibliopolis: French Book Collectors and the Culture of Print, 1880-1914 (U of Toronto P, 2008), which received the 2009 Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Prize for French and Francophone Studies, awarded by the Modern Language Association; and Henri Vever, champion de l'Art nouveau (Armand Colin, 2018), which was the subject of a 2018 symposium at the Musée des Arts décoratifs in Paris. She has published articles in Book HistoryDix-NeufContemporary French Civilization, Historical Reflections/Réflexions historiquesNineteenth-Century Art WorldwideNineteenth-Century French Studies and Quaerendo. In 2017 Dr. Silverman was a Visiting Fellow at the Van Gogh Museum, where she led a seminar entitled "Life and Art in Belle Époque Paris: Collectors, Decorative Arts, Esthetics." She is currently working on a book about Franco-American culinary exchanges from the mid-nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century.